10 SCARIEST AND MOST DANGEROUS PRISONS AND BLACKSITES YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF. NUMBER 1 MIGHT GIVE YOU NIGHTMARES

2. SALT PIT { CIA BLACKSITE } AFGHANISTAN 

The Salt Pit and Cobalt are the code names of a remote and private clandestine CIA black site prison and interrogation centre in Afghanistan.  According to Wikipedia, It is located north of Kabul and was the location of a brick factory prior to the Afghanistan War. The CIA adapted it for extrajudicial detention.

The prison was dark at all times, with curtains and painted exterior windows. Loud music was played constantly. The prisoners were kept in total darkness and isolation, with only a bucket for human waste and without sufficient heat in winter months. Nude prisoners were kept in a central area and walked around as a form of humiliation. The detainees were hosed down with water while shackled naked and placed in cold cells. They were subject to sleep deprivation, shackled to bars with their hands above their heads. Four of 20 cells of the prison had bars across the cell to facilitate this.

One senior interrogator said that his team noticed a detainee who had been chained in a standing position for 17 days, “as far as we could determine.” A senior CIA debriefer told the CIA Inspector General that she overheard stories of detainees hung for days on end with their toes barely touching the ground, choked, being deprived of food, and made the subject of a mock execution. There are almost no detailed records of the detentions and interrogations during the earliest days of the site’s existence.

Khalid El-Masri, a German citizen, was kidnapped from the Republic of Macedonia and rendered to Afghanistan. El-Masri’s name was similar to that of Khalid al-Masri, a terror suspect; the Macedonian authorities thought he might be travelling on a forged passport, and notified the regional CIA station. A team of American CIA officials were dispatched to the Republic of Macedonia, where they kidnapped El-Masri after he was released by the Macedonian officers, but without regard to his legal rights under Macedonian law. It took over two months for the CIA official who ordered his arrest to assess whether El-Masri’s passport was legitimate. El-Masri described being beaten and injected with drugs as part of his interrogation.

On May 18, 2006, U.S. Federal District Judge T.S. Ellis, III of the Eastern District of Virginia dismissed a lawsuit El-Masri filed against the CIA and three private companies allegedly involved with his transport, stating that a public trial would “present a grave risk of injury to national security.” A Court of Appeals also dismissed the case.

On October 9, 2007, the U.S Supreme Court declined to hear El-Masri’s appeal of the lower courts, without comment.

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